Skip to main content

Introduction

Ok...This is my 2nd attempt at writing a blog (my first one lasted approximately 4 hours before I realized that I wasn't motivated enough to do this). I don't profess to be an expert in this by any means, but I thought it would be worthwhile.

In my job as a baseball researcher, I come across a lot of websites and do a lot of blog reading. A couple of months ago, I came across one that was very unique- Plunkbiggio.blogspot.com. It is rare to find such a cleverly done "niche blog" and in thinking about it, I decided that it is time to create my own.

As someone who has followed and "quasi-covered" (from a journalistic perspective), the New York Mets, I am familiar with and a regular reader of many websites devoted to the team. Some of my favorites will be listed under "links." The people that run these sites and blogs do an excellent job and made it very challenging for me to think of a Mets-related blog that would serve as a nice companion to those already in existence.

To make a long story short, I have decided to create a blog that chronicles Mets walk-off moments. In watching games for the last quarter century, it has become clear that the most interesting type of Mets game to watch/write about/talk about is a walk-off win. This is a franchise that is well-known for making its fans suffer through torturous games, and the history of such is long and rich. There is a website known as "The Ultimate Mets Database" that allows fans to reminisce about games and players, and I hope that this blog can serve as a worthy, easily accessible companion to that site and others.

Let me explain what I did. Over the past two weeks, I spent about 60 to 90 minutes per day (usually between 11am and 1pm) going through boxscores at Retrosheet. I literally clicked on every home game that met the following criteria

1- Was a Mets win
2- Was decided by 4 runs or less
3- Did not involve the recording of a save

That allowed me to find the walk-offs in an easier manner. I proceeded to list those games on paper, then type them in to a Microsoft Works database. I included pertinent details, such as score, opponent, winning moment, etc. As of now, I have documented 323 such walk-off games. I cannot vouch that this number is exactly correct, though I believe I have covered every one.

On this site, I will try to, in a manner of my own choosing, document, reminisce and share my hopefully-unique perspective on those games and the personalities involved. I hope you will enjoy reading about them and I welcome your feedback in the future.

Comments

pbr said…
Glad I could encourage you to sink to my level! Looking forward to see what you come up with.

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. 
Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.
80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off 
(Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. Rather than stay and listen to the ra…

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 


The rest of the list can be found here.


20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights 
(April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969 season. Agee had a dreadful 1968 that began in spring t…

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out.

It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!)

Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required that…