Skip to main content

Possible Playoff Preview: Astros

Potential Opponent

Astros (NL Central champs)

Mets walk-off wins vs opponent

* 19 (includes one when the team was known as the Colt 45's)

Mets walk-off losses vs opponent

* 35

Postseason walk-off history vs opponent

* The Mets won Game 3 of the 1986 NLCS, 6-5 over Houston, on Len Dykstra's 2-run home run in the last of the 9th. They won Game 5, 2-1 on Gary Carter's single in the bottom of the 12th.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2005/10/heightened-perspective.html
http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2005/10/i-kid-you-not.html

Most recent walk-off win vs opponent

* April 13, 2005, when Jose Reyes singled off Dan Wheeler in the 11th inning to give the Mets a 1-0 win.

Longest walk-off win vs opponent

* It took 14 innings for the Mets to beat the Astros in Game 2 of a doubleheader on May 31, 1970, winning on Duffy Dyer's pinch-hit single.

Noteworthiest walk-off win vs opponent

* The 2 playoff games are in their own category. For regular season, there are two really good ones.

One is July 3, 1986, when the Mets scored 3 in the 10th on home runs by Darryl Strawberry and Ray Knight, to win 6-5.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2005/07/fireworks-knight.html

The other, much less well-known, is September 30, 1966, when Larry Dierker threw a perfect game for 8 innings, then lost 1-0 in the 9th on Ron Hunt's walk-off single off second baseman Joe Morgan's glove.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2005/08/perfect-walk-off.html

Most unusual walk-off win vs opponent

* The afforementioned near-perfect game would probably be the best choice, but let's also reference Jim Beauchamp's birthday-celebrating walk-off home run on August 21, 1972, giving the Mets a 4-2 win on the day he turned 33.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2006/07/birthday-bash.html

Metscellaniest walk-off tidbit regarding opponent

* Mimicking a note we ran from our Cardinals preview: Rusty Staub is the only person to have a walk-off hit for the Mets against the Astros AND have a walk-off hit for the Astros against the Mets.

Opponents Mets walk-off history

* Astros manager Phil Garner hit a two-run home run to put Houston ahead 5-3 in the 10th inning, on July 3, 1986, setting the stage for Darryl Strawberry's game-tying home run and Ray Knight's game-winner.

* Dan Wheeler's lone walk-off win as a Met came on May 9, 2004 when Kaz Matsui's double beat the Brewers, 6-5 in 11 innings.

Walk-off reasons to feel good about opponent

* Roger Clemens likely committed an act of vandalism in Shea Stadium on the evening of October 25, 1986 and has been paying for that sin for the last 20 years.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2006/06/didja-ever-notice-roger-dodger.html

True Metstros know...

The 1986 Mets are the last team to win 2 games in an NLCS in walk-off fashion.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Yikes.There's a ton of Astro awfulness in our past. But I choose (or can't help but) go to our rather recent past to remember a Mets loss to Houston I'd rather forget:

http://retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B07280HOU2005.htm

Pedro pitched beautifully but got no decision, while some chump named Ezequiel Astacio wasn't pounded by the Mets. The next night, Ezequiel's spiritual twin Wandy Rodriguez was a pain in the Asstro. All the while, Carlos Beltran was being treated like Bin Laden.

I've officially decided to not care who or where we play in the playoffs, just that we play, but boy, I'd prefer to avoid that hellhole of a joke of a twisted funhouse.

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. 
Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.
80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off 
(Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. Rather than stay and listen to the ra…

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 


The rest of the list can be found here.


20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights 
(April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969 season. Agee had a dreadful 1968 that began in spring t…

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out.

It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!)

Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required that…