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Quite Frank-ly, My Blog is Rather Dusty

It's 10:40 on Saturday night, and though I'm really looking forward to writing some postseason stuff, I'm rather fatigued, so I'll post briefly on other matters

Frank Robinson will manage his final game on Sunday bringing to a close a career in baseball that spanned more than 50 seasons. There are a lot of things that could be said about Frank Robinson, but let's just offer up this piece of information, courtesy of MikeMav.com: Since 1957, no-player has had more walk-off RBI than Frank Robinson's 27. For those curious, only one came against the Mets- a walk-off home run against Danny Frisella on July 18, 1972.

The man who ranks second on the walk-off RBI list in that span will learn his fate on Monday. Dusty Baker and the Cubs will likely part ways but I have a feeling he won't be out of work for that long. Remember that there were many wishing, not too long ago, that Baker was managing the Mets. It's a shame that his tenure ended with a season ruined by a combination of injuries and bad luck. The Cubs suffered more than their share of horrendous defeats in 2006. For those curious, Baker had 25 walk-off RBI during his playing career. Two of them came against the Mets- the first a single on September 1, 1978, the second a 2-run double against Jeff Reardon on June 20, 1980, and the last a single off Neil Allen on May 4, 1982.

True Metinsons and True Metkers know...The Mets had 5 walk-off wins against team managed by Frank Robinson and 8 walk-off wins against teams managed by Dusty Baker, including one against each in 2006.

Comments

TheCzar said…
...but I have a feeling he won't be out of work for that long. Remember that there were many wishing, not too long ago, that Baker was managing the Mets.
I hope you aren't suggesting he joins the Mets in some capacity, and that this sentence is worded like that because you are tired. Last thing the Mets need is Dusty hanging around -- he's bad karma. Lets hope Omar could find someone else to relace Manuel or Acta should they get hired away.

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