Skip to main content

To-Do List

Ok folks, I'm back in business after my time of Mets mourning, and I'm eager to get started on offseason work. Here's what I have in mind writing-wise for the next few months.

* I will put the wraps on the 2006 Mets season. I will do a walk-off year in review, as I did for 2005. I'm also dabbling with the idea of writing a more all-encompassing Mets Moments Year in Review, but I'm not sure I'm going to do that yet. I also intend to share a thought or two on what it was like to be at Game 7 (the echoes from my cries of anguish still ring in the mens room in Grand Central), and why I blame Carlos Beltran for a piece of lost luggage. I think that it will be very theraputic.

* I will do a thorough examination of the Mets offseason moves and other major baseball stories that shake down this winter, with the primary objective being to provide a walk-off perspective. You may recall that I did this last winter. Some of my most popular pieces have been trade and free agent evaluations

* I will be doing a regular series this winter called "The Best Games I Know." On October 9, I ran a piece listing the 10 best Mets wins against the Cardinals. I am going to continue that series, breaking down the Mets best wins against every NL opponent, as well as their best interleague wins (we'll find a way to include non-World Series games). I don't know how often these will run (possibly weekly). There is a lot of research involved, so bear with me. It will be worth your time to read.

* I will probably continue the "Didja Ever Notice" series. The 20th anniversary of the baseball game that took place on October 25, 1986 passed without me writing anything. I have a link or two to share and will probably have some more thoughts on the subject of Mookie/Buckner etc. in the near future.

* I will be updating the "Table of Contents" link located on the right hand side of your page.

* I am tempted to start up another database from which to cull anecdotes. Right now, the leading compilation candidate is "Mets Home Run Robs." It seems like a good subject because a) They're Amazin' plays b)No one keeps track of them c) They happen a few times a year and d) I'm still wowed, 10 days later, by the Endy Chavez catch (the ultiMet benchmark, pardon the pun). This will require major reader assistance, as "Home Run Robs" are not easy to track. I plan to work from anecdotal evidence that I can find in books, on video, and on the internet, and go from there. So, if you want to send me any information about catches you remember, feel free to do so (metswalkoffs@aol.com).

I will be posting several times per week, so keep checking in...

Comments

TheCzar said…
Looking forward to it...

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae , celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall). This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities. It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100? The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate. Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing.  Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off  (Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. R

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason). This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities. It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100? The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate. Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.  The rest of the list can be found  here . 20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights  (April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out. It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!) Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required t