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Our Special Bonds: Ownership (Answers)

Without further ado, answers to the queries posed here:
http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2007/06/our-special-bonds-ownership.html

1- You may recall us mentioning once before that Bud Harrelson had significant success against Hall of Famer Bob Gibson, but so did Wayne Garrett and Ed Kranepool.

2- Steve Carlton lost to the Mets 3 times on Opening Day. Rick Reuschel was one better, with four Opener defeats against the Mets. Lee Mazzilli homered three times against both of them.

3- By far, my favorite question of these 10. Tom Seaver homered in his only plate appearance against accused scuffballer Dave Smith and convicted felon Denny McLain.

4- Ya gotta know that the all-time Mookie Wilson triples-yielding king is Tug McGraw.

5- Those of you who remember that Curt Schilling was with the Astros in his pre-Phillies days should have gotten that one right. Anthony Young was 3-2 vs Houston, 12-46 against everyone else.

6- All of these men share the distinction of having pitched even after Rusty Staub retired. They are Steve Carlton, Nolan Ryan, and Phil Niekro.

7- Al Leiter had great success getting John Olerud out (Olerud was 1-for-9 against him). But Mark Leiter (Olerud was 10-for-13 against him) did not benefit from his brother's wisdom.

8- Did you really think we'd get through this quiz without some sort of walk-off reference? 1986 NLCS walker-offers Gary Carter (.444) and Len Dykstra (.500) both got the better of Darling in their encounters with him

9- Did you really think we'd get through this quiz without bashing Kenny Rogers, who couldn't get Joe McEwing out consistently (5-for-10), no matter how hard he tried?

10- Bruce Hurst allowed as many hits to Willie Randolph in the 1986 season (4) as he did against the Mets in Game 7 of the 1986 World Series. Randolph hit .366 in his career against Hurst, though he was only 1-for-9 against him with the Mets.

Comments

Metstradamus said…
1-I started to write Gibson and thought it was too easy and wrote down Drysdale. Sometimes the obvious answer is the right one.

2-Got Carlton, and missed with Fergie Jenkins.

3-Actually nailed that one.

4-I never got the hint and guessed Danny Darwin. Don't ask me what I was thinking.

5-Got Houston

6-Got Steve Carlton, actually guessed Tom Seaver, and I got to stop thinking about Fergie Jenkins

7-It's downhill from here as I guessed Greg Maddux. I forgot Al Leiter had a brother

8-Half right. I thought that it was Carter and Ray Knight which shared the bond of Knight driving home Carter with the fourth run in Game 6

9-I was so hoping it was Armando Benitez

10-Stumped into thinking Frank Tanana...again, what was I thinking.

So that's a score of 3.33. Excellent quiz!!!

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