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Cubs Spout

I kid you not, the song just finishing up on the radio as I pulled in my driveway at evening's conclusion was "Walk-Away Renee." How appropriate.

* Documented walk-off #343 in Mets history was the team's 2nd walk-off win of the year and first since Endy Chavez's drag bunt walk-off hit on April 24th.

* It is the 16th walk-off walk in Mets history and first since Mike Piazza's against the Brewers on August 2nd, 2005.

* The win comes nearly 45 years to the day of the Mets first walk-off walk, which came against the Cubs on May 15, 1962 (hello, AFLAC trivia question writers!). That walk was drawn by Hobie Landrith, the same Hobie Landrith who had the first walk-off home run in Mets history, on May 12, 1962. This one and that one are the only 2 Mets walk-off walks to come against the Cubs. In Landrith's case, his walk was the 15th Mets walk of the game (hello GEICO sponsorship!). Carlos Delgado's was the 7th.

(here's the Landrith walk story, written a year ago)
http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2006/05/these-blogs-are-made-for-walking.html

* It is Carlos Delgado's 9th career walk-off RBI and his second career walk-off walk (his first walk-off walk since 1997). Delgado has had a walk-off RBI in 4 straight seasons, with this one being the first in that span to come against a righthanded pitcher (previous 3 were southpaws).

* It is the 37th time that the Mets have won via walk-off against the Cubs, the first since Jose Valentin's walk-off single on July 26, 2006.

* This was the second Mets walk-off win to come on a May 14th. The other came against the Padres on May 14, 1989, and ended on an error by shortstop Luis Salazar.

* It is the first time since May 19, 1989, that 3 straight Mets walked to force in the run that gave the team a walk-off win. In that game, the Giants walked four consecutive Mets, all with two outs, to give the Mets a 3-2 win. The last walk, by Rich Gossage, was to Darryl Strawberry.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2006/01/bad-for-goose-bad-for-gander.html

* It was the third time in Carlos Delgado's Mets career that he walked in a turn lasting at least 10 pitches. He had two such appearances last season, an 11-pitch walk against Kip Wells on July 5, 2006, and a 10-pitch session against Ramon Ramirez on August 30, 2006. (thank you Baseball-Reference.com)

* It is the 43rd Mets walk-off win to end with a final score of 5-4, the 27th such game to end in regulation.

* Ron Swoboda is the Mets all time leader in walk-off walks with 4. He's the only Met with more than one. Amazingly, 3 times in his Mets career, Swoboda's walk-off walk made the Mets winners by the same 5-4 score by which they won on Monday. (Yet he remembers none of them).

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2005/06/rocky-mountain-high.html


True Metgados know..."Walk Away Renee" written by The Left Banke was released in July, 1966, approximately 3 months after Ron Swoboda's first Mets walk-off walk.

Comments

Anonymous said…
so you were listening to music on the radio and not the game?
Anonymous said…
it wasnt a walkoff win
Anonymous said…
excuse me, i meant it wasn't an extra inning win
Anonymous said…
they won it in the 9th...
metswalkoffs said…
Thank you anonymous/dan. 27th win in REGULATION. Fixed.

At 3am, I wasn't in the mood to proofread.

And no, it was 2am when I was driving home (some of us work nights), so that's why the song was heard. Believe me, I watched the game.

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