Skip to main content

Mood, Swing

About a week ago we added a "YankeeMet" blog called Eephus to our linkslist and on the day we did so, the blogger, a former Village Voice sportswriter cleverly wrote of the "horrible, no good, very bad day" in describing a Yankees defeat.


That's what today feels like if you're a Mets fan. I've used this phrase before and I'm guessing I'll use it again. Yesterday's loss wasn't a walk-off, but it might as well have been. I have maintained an optimistic viewpoint for much of the last six weeks, but that game, as well as my dad's jinxlike comment on Tuesday that "this is DEFINITELY a playoff team" have sapped some of my mental strength.

With my fingernails shredded from the chewing that was Tuesday's game, I'm left to pick at scabs, and since I don't have any at the moment, it becomes the kind of day where I gripe about things like how of Paul Lo Duca's last 17 hits, 15 have been singles.


I made a reference in the comments section of the Faith and Fear to the season having a 1987 kind of feel to it and realize now that I meant that in the "Aaron Heilman has turned into the really bad version of Jesse Orosco" sense more than anything else.


What we may be experiencing here now is a big, bad dose of 1972-injury-level-itis, for which hopefully there is some form of antibiotic. I was two years from conception and three years from birth during that campaign, one forever scarred in Mets history by Gil Hodges death, so I only know of what I read and heard about it.


On the field, the team played brilliantly for 40 games, with a 29-11 mark, and four walk-off wins before their first walk-off defeat (current 2007 count is at four walk-off wins and no walk-off losses) . But the rest of the description provided by The Complete Year by Year New York Mets Fan's Almanac, of a season in which the Mets finished 83-73 and were distantly separated from playoff contention by the end of July, isn't pleasant.


"...first Agee twisted a knee, then the whole starting lineup seemed to go down with injuries." (Hello, Moises Alou)


"Staub continued to play despite stiffness in his hand..." (Hello, Carlos Delgado)


"In late June, the entire outfield was felled..." (Hello, almost)


"The depressing injury parade continued all season...it knocked out the popular pinch-hitter...Jim Beauchamp..." (Hello, Endy Chavez)

"The anemic offense batted .188 and averaged 2.6 runs per game in July..." (hello, really bad current 7-game stretch)

The funny thing is that the team is still 3 1/2 games up on its chief rival, and has the luxury of a wild-card to chase should things get really hairy. A win today would probably do wonders for the spirit of the Mets fan, but considering who the Philadelphia moundsman is this evening, it's not something you should probably be counting on.

Today is the major league baseball amateur draft, a subject I originally planned to write about, but have since changed my plans, particularly after I looked up the date and its significance in Mets history, and found more bad news.

On June 7, 1966, the Mets had the first pick in the draft and selected talented high school catcher Steve Chilcott. He never played a game in the major leagues. The second pick went to the Athletics, who handled it with a little more aplomb. They selected Reggie Jackson.

True Metcotts know...The first Mets first-round pick to have a walk-off hit for the team was 1973 first-rounder and current SNY analyst Lee Mazzilli, against the Pirates on September 20, 1976.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. 
Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.
80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off 
(Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. Rather than stay and listen to the ra…

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 


The rest of the list can be found here.


20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights 
(April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969 season. Agee had a dreadful 1968 that began in spring t…

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out.

It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!)

Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required that…