Skip to main content

Our Special Bonds: Ownership (Questions)

So after the nice reaction I got to my Barry Bonds trivia quiz, it struck me that I should make this a quasi-regular blog feature in the mold of "Best Games I Know" and "Didja Ever Notice?"

With that in mind, I went looking for a topic that I could make both educational and enjoyable. I found it in the subject of "Ownership."

I'm not talking about the kind that involves the Paysons or Wilpons. My subject is more related to something I wrote about not long ago- the idea of "Metskilledya" as it relates to the individual player.

Metskilledya- Of or relating to the idea of one being dominated by the Mets.

Origin of the word: Latvian Orthodox. Derived from the Seinfeldian "Cantstandya."

Alternate pronunciations: None, though you can give it an extra-nasal inflection, if you like.

Use in a sentence: "Darold Knowles, he of 1973 World Series heroics, came down with a case of Metskilledya later in his career, blowing saves in 4 consecutive appearances against them."

The topic came up repeatedly during this past week.

* After reading my Bonds quiz, a colleague conjured a fascinating hint as to which former Red yielded three career home runs to Cleon Jones (combine the first names of two 1969 Mets and you get Gary Nolan).

* I had a discussion with former Met pitcher Gary Kroll, who insisted he struck Willie Mays out 11 times in 18 at-bats (not true, but Hall of Famers Hank Aaron, Frank Robinson and Eddie Mathews all struggled against him)

* In advising fellow blogger Greg at Faith and Fear regarding an interview with former Met for a Minute Steve Springer, I made sure to point out that Springer went 0-4 with 3 strikeouts against Roger Clemens, a note that apparently had a good backstory to it.

So with that in mind, I went to work, trying to produce some minutiae worthy of your consumption. I should note that I've phrased the questions similar in style to a "Name That Met" quiz conducted by the Faith and Fear folks some time ago (imitation=flattery) but tried to put my own special twist on them.

A note before we begin: You'll know that such a quiz is coming if you see the "Our Special Bonds" title...I've decided, in the spirit of good wordplay, that it's an appropriate title. It's also the phrase I used to describe the attendance of my sister and I at Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS, so it has a special meaning for me beyond minutiae.

Special thanks to Baseball-Reference.com without which this would have been tough to do.

Here are the questions.

The link to the answers can be found here:
http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2007/04/our-special-bonds-ownership-answers.html

1) It was a hoot when Wayne Garrett or Bud Harrelson stepped to the plate against this intimidating mound presence, against whom each had a .333 batting average Ed Kranepool (.313) also hit this man well. Name him.


2) Lee Mazzilli hit more home runs (3) against Bob Sykes and these 2 Opening Day regulars (particularly against the Mets) than any other pitchers he faced. Name the two.

3) There are 2 pitchers of whom Tom Seaver can say "I hit them perfectly. 1-for-1, with a home run." One gave up a famous home run in Mets history and has at times been alleged of unsavory on-field acts. The other achieved a major baseball milestone not long before the time of the Miracle Mets and has had unsavory off-field issues. Name them.


4) I believe that Mookie Wilson had more triples against this pitcher than any other he faced (3 in just 12 at-bats). Name him.


5) Anthony Young's first major-league win came against the only team against whom he had a winning record for his career (3-2). Curt Schilling pitched in that inaugural Young victory. Name the team that Anthony Young "owned."


6) Not surprisingly, considering his and their longevity, the 3 pitchers against whom Rusty Staub had the most RBI are Hall of Famers. Name them.


7) This pitcher, well known to both Mets and Yankees fans, has a family member against whom John Olerud was very fluid, going 10-for-13 with 6 walks. Name the family.

8) Three members of the 1986 Mets faced Ron Darling 10 or more times and had a .400 or better career batting average against him. One is Tim Corcoran. The other two share a pertinent special bond of their own. Name them.

9) Most Mets fans know that Joe McEwing had some success against Randy Johnson (4-for-6 in 2000) but I think it would give them greater pleasure to know that he had a .500 career batting average (5-for-10) against a former Mets pitcher. Name him.

10) Mets manager Willie Randolph had more hits (34) against this pitcher, one with a significant connection to Mets history, than any other he faced. Name this southpaw.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. 
Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.
80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off 
(Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. Rather than stay and listen to the ra…

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 


The rest of the list can be found here.


20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights 
(April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969 season. Agee had a dreadful 1968 that began in spring t…

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out.

It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!)

Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required that…