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X Marks The Spot

Regular blog reader Ron Rohn chimes in with the following contribution. Feel free to post your suggestions in the comments section.

"Lately I've been thinking about Shea not being there in a few years. I'm sure next year there will be many remembrances, as for most Met Fans it is the only home we have ever known.
Once Shea is gone, a parking lot will take it's place.

In Philly they painted home plate and the bases were at the old Vet. In my opinion they should paint those, plus the foul - lines, and where the dugouts were etc, so Met fans can always walk and view where some of their favorite memories happened.

I started thinking, if they were going to place a marker ( like a pole with a small plaque or something ) at spots on the field where "special" things happened, what would you put in your Top Ten????

Most would have to be defensive, since offensive plays don't happen in the field per se. But you could pick anything. Here's my shot at a list to start:

1) The spot where the ball went under Buckner's Glove (no brainer).

2) The spot where Cleon caught the final out of the 1969 World Series. (not far from where Cliff caught his last year)

3) The spot where Piazza's HR landed vs. the Braves on the first game back from 9/11. (considering the emotions involved, one of the top 3 moments in NY sports behind Willis walking onto the court at the Garden in 1970 and the opening bell of Ali-Frazier I)

4) The spot where Ron Swoboda caught the sinking liner in the 1969 Series.

5/6) The spots where Agee made his two catches in the 69 series.

7) The spot where Endy made his catch last year. ( if the Mets win that game and go to the World Series it would move up to #2)

8) Spot behind home plate, where Willie Mays announced his retirement before a game in Sept. 1973. With tears in his eyes, the best "all around player" to ever play baseball "said good-bye to america".

I think those 8 are all legit Top Ten choices. I'm up in the air as to what should take the final two spots. Possible choices:

-- Spot where Rusty Staub crashed into the wall, wrecking his shoulder but holding on to the ball in Game #4 of the NLCS 1973

-- Spot where Bud Harrelson and Pete Rose got into the fight, NCLS 1973

-- Spot where Jesse Orosco's glove came down after striking out Marty Barret for the final out of the 1986 World Series.

-- Spot where parachute man landed in 1986 World Series.

-- Spot where Leo Durocher crossed paths with the black cat in 1969.

-- Spot between 1st and 2nd where Robin Ventura was intercepted by Todd Pratt after hitting his Grand Slam single in play-off vs. Braves

-- Spot where Lenny Dykstra's walk-off HR vs. Astros landed in 1986 NLCS.

-- Spot where Todd Pratt's HR landed to win series vs. Arizona

-- Though not METS moments:
-- Spot where Johnny Callison HR landed to win 1964 All-Star Game.
-- Spot where the stage was for Beatles first concert in USA
-- Can't think of anything for the Jets!

Let me know if you think I have missed anything obvious."

Comments

Stormy said…
Wow, great topic.

Didn't the Braves do the same thing with Fulton County?

I like the Lenny HR idea as well.

How about where every base hit landed in the 10th inning of Game 6?

Or where the black cat visited Mr. Santo?
Anonymous said…
Heidi Game was in Oakland.
Anonymous said…
Braves have a mark where Aaron's 715th landed.
metswalkoffs said…
Correct, reference to Heidi is now removed. Thanks.

Correct on the Aaron 715 spot. Saw it when I went to Atlanta last year.
Ceetar said…
I don't think you can really 'pick' moments to be remembered and forgotten. It would be cool to mark the bases and walls or something. Then we can remember where all these moments were ourselves.

"Where'd you park?"

"Right where Buckner missed the ball."
Unknown said…
Couldn't agree more with your list, especially #3 (Piazza). Just remembering that game and moment brings chills.

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