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Houston, Me Have A Problem

I noticed an odd quirk in my database for which I don't really have a logical explanation and it pertains to the team the Mets are facing this weekend.

If you go back to the teams that existed when the Mets came into being in 1962, the team against whom they've struggled most at getting walk-off wins against is the Astros.

Consider this chart

Mets Walk-Off Wins vs Opponent
All-Time (including postseason)

Dodgers 29 (266 home games played)
Astros 19 (266 home games played)

and this one

Mets Walk-Off Wins vs Opponent
All-Time (includes postseason)

Astros 19 (266 home games played)
Padres 19 (203 home games played)

Does that make any sense to you?

What I find even odder is that the Mets have 35 walk-off losses against the Astros (in 268 road games). If you break it down even further, you could look at this chart

Mets vs Astros
Walk-Off Wins Compared

Mets 19 walk-off wins out of 139 home wins (1 out of every 7.3 wins is a walk-off)
Astros 36 walk-off wins out of 165 home wins (1 out of every 4.6 wins is a walk-off)

I don't really have any answers for the disparities and that's bothering me at the moment as I ponder the possibilities behind this.

Maybe this is what I get for seeing the thriller 1408 yesterday, a film in which the main character always has an explanation for the unexplainable, until he stays in a particularly frightening haunted hotel. I was planning on seeing Sicko in the next 24 hours. Perhaps Michael Moore has some sort of solution to fix the Mets injury woes.

True Metstronauts know...That there's another series of charts that strikes me as rather odd.

Mets Walk-Off Wins vs Opponents
All-Time, includes postseason

Diamondbacks 4 (out of 39 home games played, 20 Mets wins)
Rockies 4 (out of 63 home games played, 43 Mets wins)

Comments

Unknown said…
Wow. 1 out of every 4.7 Astros win is a walkoff? Unreal.
metswalkoffs said…
In fact, I forgot to include a walk-off loss when the team was known as Colt 45s, so it's 1 every 4.6 (yes, that's just me being anal).

It is a very bizarre phenomenon though.

In my database, I have the Mets with an all-time walk-off record of 347-365, but if you take out the Astros, it's basically .500 at 328-329. Go figure.
Anonymous said…
Picture the Astrodome. Picture Minute Maid Park/Astros Field/Enron Field. Picture a line drive just fair. Picture a hapless reliever trudging off. Picture (with your ears) way too much noise. Picture a jubilant congregation of anonymous Astros at home plate.

I don't have a problem picturing any of this. It seems the norm. Thus, the numbers make perfect, sad sense to me.

(Bless you Game Six.)

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