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Touch Your Screen For Good Luck

Whatever your rituals and superstitions are for when you're faced with important moments in your (sports-fan) life, take great care to observe them on Sunday.

For those of you who didn't watch the Mets-Marlins game on TV on Saturday (I know a few who were in attendance), one of the best moments of the broadcast was when Kevin Burkhardt showed how the Mets placed a picture, in fact, the picture that adorns the top of this blog, in the walkway from the clubhouse, with instructions to tap it before entering the dugout.

I'm a big believer in that kind of stuff, as silly as it sounds, making a difference. I have things that I do in certain circumstances and resorted to a few on Saturday morning. I know, in my brain, that they had no impact on what happened on the field, but in my heart, I felt like I was contributing to the effort. Believing that I matter is silly and in some ways, ridiculous, but it's important. It's part of being a fan and in fact, it's probably my favorite part. If I'm going to commit to living vicariously through the lives of 25 strangers for 180 days, it's a necessity.

And you can be sure I have a few things in mind for Sunday too.

It's worth noting that the Mets don't exacty have it easy with this pitching matchup. Dontrelle Willis is 5-0 in his career at Shea Stadium and the Marlins have only lost once in his starts there.

Might I remind you, it was via walk-off.

True MetMaine know...John Maine is the first Mets pitcher since Rick Reed to strike out 12+ and allow no runs, in a game taking place in September/October. Reed did so on the final Saturday of the 1999 season, a day before a rather famous contest in Mets history, one that you can read about at the link below.

http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2005/09/i-want-my-turn-at-bat.html

Comments

Stormy said…
I also have quite a few of these silly superstitions. I won't bore you with all of them, but I did make a change yesterday.

About two weeks ago, I was on the receiving end of a horrible haircut. After receiving said haircut, I had to buy a hat immediately to cover the damage. I bought a replica classic Mets hat, as it was the only one Mets hat at the store. I've been wearing it exclusively since then & we know how those two weeks have gone.

Yesterday, I reverted back to this year's BP hat, which I've worn all season. Needless to say, that hat, along with my Mookie '86 jersey, will be worn today.

LGM!
Stormy said…
Well that didn't work. >:(

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