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The Official Mets Walk-Offs Dictionary

Agbayani List: List of hard-to-spell Mets.

Agent Zero: A player who has had zero (singles, doubles, etc) in their Mets career

Agony To Ecstasy Finish: Game won when the final out is recorded on an opponents base hit.

Armando Junior: A 30+ pitch 1-inning save.

Bail-Out Walk-Off: Walk-off in which a save chance is blown in the top of the 9th.

Benitezian Save: Save in which a pitcher walks 4+ in an inning or less

Best Games I Know: Favorite Mets wins, sorted by opponent.

Bugaboo: Pitcher against whom you have no HR, or no hits.

Caught-Off: Game that ends on a caught stealing

Chalk-Off: When a ball, on the precipice of fair/foul status, hits chalk.

Charles Schulz: Wise American philosopher, though not a Mets fan.

Clockhands Final: Game in which the final score is 12-6.

Didja Ever Notice?: Name given to questions regarding the events of October 25, 1986.

GT2O RBI: Abbreviation for Game-Tying RBI with 2 outs in the 9th.

HOTWOOD: Stands for "Home Openers That Weren't On Opening Day."

Jerry Seinfeld: Wise American philosopher and Mets fan.

McRae List: A list of bad Mets players.

Metiquette: Proper behavior regarding when you leave your seat at a Mets game

Metskilledya: Players or teams against whom the Mets dominate.

Metsmerizing Walk-Up: A game in which the home team takes the lead in the bottom of the 8th, and the closer strikes out the side in the top of the 9th.

NeverMets: Mets in name, but never in game.

1-2 Punch: Games in which the Mets score one run and get two hits, and win.

Our Special Bonds: Link that my sister and I share after attending 2006 NLCS Game 7. Also the name for trivia quizzes posed by this writer.

Restrained Jubilation: The art of being happy about a walk-off, yet slightly dissatisfied at the same time

A ROD: Abbreviation for A Road Opening Day game

Santa Klaus: Nickname for former Mets legend Bobby Klaus.

Santo Clause: The yelling out of "Oh no!!!!!!!!" when your team loses by walk-off.

Shawnukkah: Holiday celebrated by fans of Shawn Green.

Sheaing in Pain: Trying to blog about the Mets through injury or illness.

Skate-Off: Hockey's version of a walk-off.

Spy: Nickname for Mets anti-legend Tom Glavine.

Stan Jefferson Rule: If you have a chance to see someone's Mets debut, you do it.

Stomp-Off: Game in which the Mets score enough runs in the first inning to win the game.

The Commandments: Manners you must follow if you root for Moises Alou.

Tidrow List: List of worst Mets relievers.

Vandal: Nickname for the ex-Red Sox and Yankees pitcher who started 1986 WS Game 6

Walk-Off Asterisk: Game ending via walk-off, sort of.

Walk-Off Baby: Child born immediately following a walk-off win.

Walk-Off Lament: Utterance of someone whose hopes of a walk-off have been dashed, as in "Why couldn't McCovey have hit the ball just two feet higher???"

Walk-Off Pier 6 Brawl: Game ending in a fight.

Walk-Off Piracy: Stealing a win from an opponent, via walk-off.

Walk-Off Stumble: Game that ends with a serious of rather bizarre mistakes, as happened for the Mets on April 18, 2008.

Walk-Off Throw-off: Game ending on an error by the pitcher.

Walk-Off Tightrope: Ending a game by surviving a bases-loaded jam in the final inning. Bill James refers to 3 on, 0 out escapes as "Houdinis."

Walk-Up Win: Game in which the home team takes the lead for good in the bottom of the 8th inning.

Wall-Off: When ball or player hits the outfield wall in a key moment, a thorough study of which was done on April 1, 2008.

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The rest of the list can be found here.


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