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You Are A Magnificent (Angel) Pagan Beast

I quote from the pilot episode of Cheers in this blog entry, hoping that walk-off win #349 will serve as the pilot episode for a better season ahead.

For those curious, the quote originates from Diane taking a phone message for Sam. When she gets done, Sam asks for the message. Diane replies with the line I used in the title. Sam's punchline is "Thanks. What's the message?"

From what I understand, you're supposed to keep things simple when writing a pilot episode, so we'll do so with these notes.

* It only took the Mets 8 games (3 at home) to ensure that they'd have at least one walk-off win for the 47th straight season. It was their first walk-off win since August 21, 2007, when Luis Castillo singled in the winning run.

* It's the first walk-off win against the Phillies since Carlos Beltran beat them with a 16th inning home run on May 23, 2006. It is the 34th walk-off win for the Mets against the Phillies, and only the second to last 12 innings. The other was May 25, 1971, a 5-4 triumph over Jim Bunning on Bob Aspromonte's walk-off single.

* The hit was the first walk-off hit of Angel Pagan's major league career.

* It's the first walk-off win to end with a 4-3 final score since May 3, 2006, when Carlos Delgado beat the Pirates with a 12th inning home run.

* It is the first walk-off win for Jorge Sosa as a Met.

* It was the 2nd noteworthy accomplishment for Pagan and Jose Reyes as a tandem. EARLIER in the season, they became the 4th and 5th players in Mets history to drive in a run in each of their first four games of a season. The only player in Mets history to do better: David Wright, who had an RBI in six straight games to start 2006. The other two Mets to do it in their first four: Bernard Gilkey (1996) and Ken Boyer (1966).

* It marks the 4th straight season that the Mets have had a 12-inning walk-off win. It's also the 4th straight season the Mets have had a walk-off win in April.

* It was the second April 10th walk-off in Mets history, the first since they beat the Reds on April 10, 1971, on a walk-off wild pitch by Wayne Granger.

added by popular demand at 11:30 am
True Metgans know... Pitchers to both get a walk-off win for the Mets and take a walk-off loss against the Mets include

Juan Acevedo
Neil Allen
Armando Benitez
Ricky Bottalico
Dennis Cook
Dave Eilers
John Franco
Mark Guthrie (gave up a walk-off hit, albeit didn't suffer the loss)
Doug Henry
Roberto Hernandez
Jason Isringhausen
Barry Jones
Roger McDowell
Tug McGraw
Greg McMichael
Blas Minor
Alejandro Pena
Jeff Reardon
Dick Selma
Jorge Sosa
Mike Stanton
Turk Wendell
Dan Wheeler
(I won't assure this is a complete list...I eyeballed it...but it's close enough)

Comments

Anonymous said…
Sosa lost a walkoff game to the Mets two years ago, that magnificent pagan beast of a 14-inning thriller over Atlanta. Enquiring minds want to know the story on the same pitchers winning and losing Mets Walkoffs.
Anonymous said…
Nice jog for the Mets and Angel Pagan who is just red hot.By the way check out my blog at Mets magic Team: http://www.metsmagicteam.blogspot.com/
Anonymous said…
Congrats on the first walk-off of the season. A great ending, and I'm quickly becoming a huge Pagan fan.

It was also our second no hitter broken up by a leadoff hit of the season. 46 years to the day, and counting ...
Ravi said…
Your post is missing something....

What is it tha the True Metgans know?
metswalkoffs said…
True Metgans know... Pitchers to both get a walk-off win for the Mets and take a walk-off loss against the Mets include

Juan Acevedo
Neil Allen
Armando Benitez
Ricky Bottalico
Dennis Cook
Dave Eilers
John Franco
Mark Guthrie (gave up a walk-off hit, albeit didn't suffer the loss)
Doug Henry
Roberto Hernandez
Jason Isringhausen
Barry Jones
Roger McDowell
Tug McGraw
Greg McMichael
Blas Minor
Alejandro Pena
Jeff Reardon
Dick Selma
Jorge Sosa
Mike Stanton
Turk Wendell
Dan Wheeler
(I won't assure this is a complete list...I eyeballed it...but it's close enough)
Anonymous said…
Mark-

I may have missed it somewhere, but not having a walk off since last August, begs the question(s):
1) What is the longest gap between Mets walk-offs (both in games played, and in calander days).
metswalkoffs said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
metswalkoffs said…
And if you want to know the shortest period of time between walk-off wins:

That's a toss-up...the Mets have had 4 doubleheaders in which they've swept both via walk-off win.

Chances are the answer is either August 23, 1964 or July 31, 1983.

The 1964 Game 2 ended 3 hours, 3 minutes after it began.

The 1983 Game 2 ended 3 hours, 2 minutes after it began.

The issue is: we don't know how much time was taken between games...

Oh, great mysteries of life, and walk-offs...
metswalkoffs said…
Ok, this is now in the wrong order, post-wise, because i screwed up...

Anonymous, if you're going to reference my name, shouldn't you reference yours? :)

Your answer is 356 days.

The Mets last walk-off win in 1980 came on September 29. The Mets first walk-off win in the strike season of 1981 came on September 20.

I don't like that answer because of the strike situation.

The alternative answer is 341 days
The Mets last walk-off in 1968 came on May 21. The Mets first walk-off in 1969 came on April 27. They played 142 games in between.

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