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Im'peach'able Offense

For my recap of Game 1
http://metswalkoffs.blogspot.com/2008/05/peach-pit.html

Ok so for $55 more, I got a better view, and I got to sit with people who, for lack of a better term, "got me."

For the first game of the doubleheader, I was much more irritant than entertainment, to the two grandmas a couple rows in front of me in the upper tank (as Keith Hernandez would call it) and the fellow seated to my left, who borrowed his beard from (former Brave) Bruce Sutter.

They seemed bothered when I yelled out to Tom Glavine that he owed us another 6 runs, and warned John Maine when he came to the plate that "there's a rumor that every 20 years or so, this guy hits a pitcher, so look out."

At least after all the waiting for Game 2, the people around me took my remarks in stride, and fired back. When I remarked that New York was a little too sophisticated to play the sounds of barnyard animals after foul balls were hit, the fellow in front of me (we'll call him "Jersey Middletown," since I never got his name), turned around and gave me a "woof, woof" after Jose Reyes was caught stealing. When I warned him not to mock Carlos Delgado, since he'd be playing first base for the Braves next year after Mark Teixeira bolts, he chuckled. He even appreciated my Tom Glavine analysis.

As it turned out "Jersey Middletown" was a former Mets fan, who remembered 1969 well (he was 12), loved Dwight Gooden, and still had the original VHS copy of his tape of Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. He converted to the dark side (LOL) when he moved to Atlanta in 1988, went to a game, and took pity on the local team while watching Nolan Ryan from a front-row seat with the other 999 in attendance that day.

Being a Braves fan must have sucked some of the baseball wisdom out of him though. He and his crew departed after 7 1/2 innings. Would you go to a Broadway show and leave before the final act? (I've asked that before)

The people on the elevator in the hotel, "got me" too, but that made more sense, since they were Mets fans. As I wished them good night, I threw in the line "Two days of false hope, one day of reality." They laughed.

The truly Metpeachable (and maybe even "Jersey Middletown") know...The last time the Mets were swept in a doubleheader, IN ATLANTA was, amazingly enough, July 26 1986. They lost the second game of that doubleheader in walk-off fashion, on a Ted Simmons sacrifice fly.

Comments

SS said…
Ugh what an awful day. How is that stadium?

I still have the entire 86 and 88 playoffs on VHS!
Anonymous said…
A few points about the current Mets:
1. Luis Castillo will go down as one of the worst 2B FA signings in club history. He's Baerga without power. He's a dumb fielder and never hits in the clutch.
2. Pelfrey deserves a better fate, but they never hit for him.
3. Heilman has been on this team THREE years too long. The failure to recognize this is Minaya's fault, not Randolph's.
4. Marlon Anderson is done. He makes Pat Burrell look like a Gold Glover in LF. And his hitting isn't enough to merit playing.
5. Carlos Beltran and Jose Reyes rarely hit in the clutch, particularly Reyes. Nice HR the other night when it was 8-2. He's a fraud.
Conclusion: The Mets need to blow it up and start again. The Santana deal was too little for a club full of chokers.
Phils will repeat and the Mets will watch the Yankees (who will sneak into the postseason with 88-90 wins) celebrate the final year of their stadium.
-- JerseyBucsFan

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