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Live Demonstration of How My Brain Works as It Watches A Televised Baseball Game RAINED OUT

7:15 PM

Ok, so since the game is postponed, I'm calling off this plan...maybe I'll do it Saturday. We'll see...

But let's answer the trivia question.

Against which team did Willie Randolph have his highest batting average?
The answer is...the Yankees. The beleagured Mets manager (don't feel much like talking about that) hit .349 against his former team during the 1990-1991 seasons.


7:00 PM
Ok, so what are we gonna do here? (especially if we've got a rain delay)

I don't know. I was just looking for a way to have a little fun, since I'm hanging at home today, prior to my trip to Atlanta for Mets-Braves next week, and doing some writing on Mets-Yankees seemed to be a good way to go.

I remembered a conversation that I had with someone at work, the day after the season ended, and after I was able to provide rapid-response details on something he considered baseball-significant, he made the comment:

"Your brain works a little differently than other peoples."

People seem to find that interesting. And with the emergence of this blog, that's come into play on a regular basis. So I'm here to share, I suppose. If something interesting happens in this game, you'll probably find me tying it to something of a historical or anecdotal nature after an inning or so has passed. If nothing interesting happens, I may wax poetic with commentary on trivia, the broadcast crew (I got my "It's Outta Here!" t-shirt from GaryKeithandRon.com today).

So as a wise man named Murphy once said "Fasten your seatbelts..." Hopefully you'll find it to be a fun ride.

And we'll start with a trivia question...

Against which team did Mets manager Willie Randolph have his highest career batting average against? (Answer after the top of the first inning)


one note on posting: everything will be within one post...most recent notes on top, and I'll probably be 1/2- to 1 innings behind the action.

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