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Butch Huskidy and the Sunshine Kid

It's common for me on an off-day to thumb through the Mets media guide, randomly looking for notes of interest.

Today, for some reason, I was drawn to page 204, which lists the longest hitting streak in Mets history.

If you were going to play "Who doesn't belong" on the list of those to have hit in 20 or more consecutive games for the Mets, the name that stands out is Butch Huskey.

Butch Huskey's 20-game hit streak is pertinent to this blog because of a funky coincidence. The first and last games were both walk-off wins.

Huskey didn't get the headlines on either August 22, when the hitting streak commenced, nor September 13, when it reached its apex. The latter occurred on the day of the "Brand New Shiny" walk-off. The former was due to a story of another nature.

Remember when Bobby Valentine griped that Todd Hundley wasn't getting enough sleep? Remember Hundley's response?

It came on that day in a rather wacky contest between the Mets and Padres at Shea. The Mets trailed 5-1 in the seventh inning. Huskey entered the game in a double switch and got a hit in the fifth, but his hit in the seventh was more significant. It was an infield single that scored Luis Lopez, cutting the Mets deficit to 5-3. Huskey would come home a short while later, scoring the tying run on Matt Franco's two-run double.

It looked like the Padres would win in regulation, when they scored three times against the combo of Cory Lidle and Mel Rojas in the top of the ninth inning. But the Mets rallied in the home half. With two outs, John Olerud doubled home Carl Everett, cutting the deficit to 8-6.

Who was up next but Todd Hundley. In one great moment of theater, Hundley came through, bashing a two-run home run to tie the score. As Hundley put it to reporters after the game: "Actions speak louder than words."

Huskey and Hundley would play integral roles in providing the Mets with the winning run in the 11th inning. Huskey reached to start the frame, on a throwing error by first baseman Archi Cianfrocco. A subsequent walk, flyout and groundout moved the runners to second and third. Hundley was up but would not bat, as he was purposely passed to load the bases.

With the count 1-0, Padres reliever Doug Bochtler removed himself from the game due to injury. His replacement, Will Cunnane, was expectledly wild. He walked Carlos Baerga on a 3-1 pitch, bringing Huskey home with the winning run.

True Metskeys know...In the Mets "Brand New Shiny" win over the Expos on September 13, it was Huskey who started the rally from 6-0 down in the ninth inning with a one out single.

Longest Hitting Streaks
Mets History

30- Moises Alou
26- David Wright
24- Mike Piazza, Hubie Brooks
23- Cleon Jones, Mike Vail, John Olerud
21- Mike Piazza
20- Tommie Agee, Edgardo Alfonzo, Cliff Floyd, Butch Huskey, Jose Reyes

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