Skip to main content

Good Friday To You

Random blogger minutiae and reminiscing from a Friday night ...

* Carlos Delgado has 13 seasons of 20+ HR. How many players who have played for the Mets have managed that?

Hit 20+ HR in 13+ Seasons
Played for Mets at Some Point

17- Willie Mays
16- Eddie Murray
13- Carlos Delgado
>> Mike Piazza, Jeff Kent and Dave Kingman each had 12 such seasons

Interesting piece of trivia...the last 4 players that Carlos Delgado passed on the Mets all-time HR list (he has 82)...

Cliff Floyd (81)
Keith Hernandez (80)
Robin Ventura (77)
Rusty Staub (75)

Delgado now tied with Mets Hall of Famer Tommie Agee for 16th on the team's all-time home run list.

* Argenis Reyes is the 336th player to hit a HR for the Mets. He and Jose Reyes have now combined for 57 home runs. By the way, the club record for most HR by 2 players sharing the last name- 202 by Howard (192) and Lance Johnson (10).

* I know Mike Pelfrey's numbers are going to be all the rage on Saturday, but let's look at how much his stuff plays to Shea Stadium.

Pelfrey's numbers from his last five starts at Shea

37 IP
4 R
28 H
29 K
3 BB

A colleague of mine pointed out the similarities between Pelfrey and Ron Darling a few weeks ago. He may be on to something. Darling was very much a guy who pitched to Shea Stadium.

Ron Darling
Career at Shea: 57-29, 3.09 ERA
Career elsewhere: 79-87, 4.30 ERA

* Suggested headlines from the MetsWalkoffs family for Brandon Knight's Mets Debut...The possibilities are endless, though I imagine everyone is going to be picking "Saturday Knight Live."

If It goes well...

A Midsummer Knight's Dream
One Summer Knight
In The Still of the Knight
Oh What a Knight
Knight Moves
Good Knight and Good Luck
Knight's Tale
Saturday Knight Thrive

and if it doesn't

Heartache ToKnight
Hard Days Knight

True Metfreys know...July 26 is a good day for walk-off wins. The Mets have had 3 of them on this date, in 1983, 2002, and 2006.

The 1983 walk-off has some significance. It marks the last time a Mets starter got a win by pitching 10 innings or more. It was a fine pitcher's duel between Mets starter Mike Torrez (coming off a 10-walk outing in his last appearance) and Braves starter Rick Camp (pre 18th-inning heroics).

The Braves lone run came in the fourth inning on a home run by ex-Met Claudell Washington. The lone Mets tally in regulation came via Bob Bailor's two-out RBI single in the sixth, scoring Darryl Strawberry.

The excitement in this one was stirred in the fifth inning when Mookie Wilson was hit by a pitch, and then Torrez retaliated by plunking Camp in the sixth. The benches cleared, though no ejections were proffered. Torrez escaped trouble a few times thereafter, including in the top of the 10th, surviving a first-and-third situation without damage.

Wilson got his revenge in the 10th, hitting a game-winning home run, off Ken Dayley, giving the Mets their second straight walk-off victory against Atlanta, their first to come on a July 26.

Comments

Anonymous said…
The last time a Knight started for the Mets was also a Saturday night: October 25, 1986.
Anonymous said…
Last time a Met started a SATURDAY Knight game, that is.
Binny said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
Binny said…
Nitpick alert: Rick Camp's "heroics" took place in the 18th (unless, of course, you mean allowing 5 runs to score, helping bring about a conclusion to that marathon, which I'm sure many would consider an act of heroism).

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. 
Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.
80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off 
(Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. Rather than stay and listen to the ra…

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 


The rest of the list can be found here.


20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights 
(April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969 season. Agee had a dreadful 1968 that began in spring t…

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out.

It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!)

Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required that…