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It's 3 AM, Is your Manager Safe?

I just got finished watching the Mets latest press conference and I have to say I'm stunned.

In case you missed it, here's a quick recap:

Jerry Manuel, out as Mets manager. Boy that was quick.
The new Mets manager is Mike Scioscia.

Sandy Alomar Sr, have a happy retirement
The new Mets bench coach is Kirk Gibson.

Howard Johnson...see you at the 2029 Mets Hall of Fame induction. Hope you're still alive to be a part of it.
The new Mets hitting coach is Terry Pendleton.

Ken Oberkfell...That didn't last long.
The new Mets first base coach is Brian Jordan.

And wow, how about that trade? Fernando Martinez, Jonathan Niese, and future considerations for Yadier Molina. Oh, the irony.

"We wanted to surround Luis Aguayo with the best possible people," said Mets general manager Omar Minaya, speaking of the only Mets coach who survived the purge. "The people around him were inhibiting his ability to be a successful third base coach. Never mind that we had two coaches with more third-base coaching experience than him on our staff. It's about creating the right culture for our team."

Among others who were considered for positions within the revamped organization: Billy Hatcher and Dave Henderson. Both were reportedly rejected for failure to meet certain skill sets required by owner Fred Wilpon. "They couldn't beat us, so they can't join us," Wilpon told Minaya.

Pitching coach Dan Warthen and bullpen coach Guy Conti were also relieved of their duties. Their replacements were not named, but Minaya was said to be considering a possibility of bringing back either Kenny Rogers or Tom Glavine in the role of player/coach (Glavine acknowledged being "devastated" when he learned he was being released by the Braves). Cesar Cedeno was also said to be in the mix for a possible position with the team in the near-future.

Comments

Anonymous said…
With all that news, I guess it was obscured that the 75 Greatest Moments at Shea ballot was unveiled before the game by Luis Sojo.

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