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To The Victorino Goes the Spoils

* Walk-off loss #377 was the Mets 6th walk-off loss of the season, surpassing their total from all of 2007.

* It marks the 2nd time this season that the Mets have lost 2 games by walk-off in a 3-game span (Padres, June 5, 7).

* This is the 40th time that the Phillies have beaten the Mets in walk-off fashion, and the third straight season in which they've had at least one walk-off win against the Mets.

* Duaner Sanchez is the 6th different pitcher to be on the mound at the end of a Mets walk-off loss this season, joining Matt Wise, Aaron Heilman, Scott Schoeneweis, Pedro Feliciano and Carlos Muniz.

* This is the 2nd time in Mets history that they lost a July 4 game in walk-off fashion. I don't feel like looking up the details, but the other defeat game via walk-off catcher's error (Norm Sherry) against the Cubs on July 4, 1963.

* Carlos Beltran, who looks as lost at the plate as at any point in his Mets career, is now 3-for-26 in games that the Mets have lost in walk-off fashion in 2008. He is 2-for-24 in his last 6 games overall, with 11 strikeouts. He is basically becoming to the Mets offense what Tom Glavine was to the Mets pitching staff at the end of 2007.

* Chad Durbin becomes the 3rd pitcher to face 7 or fewer Mets in a game and strike out at least 6. The other 2 are Juan Cruz of the Cubs on Opening Day, 2003, and amazingly, Willie Hernandez of the Phillies, July 3, 1983 (nearly 25 years to the day). The Phillies won that game, 6-4 on a walk-up (not off) home run by Mike Schmidt.

True Metorinos know...Shane Victorino is the 2nd player born in Hawaii with a walk-off hit against the Mets. The other was former Atlanta Brave Mike Lum, on August 23, 1974.

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