Skip to main content

Payback is a Botch

Memo to Omar Infante: Just as yelling at Tom Glavine for two hours in his adopted hometown is a bad way to toy with the karma gods, so is teasing a fan in the Shea bleachers.

* Mets walk-off win #355 is their 7th this season, with the most recent coming via David Wright's two-run home run against the Padres on August 7.

* Mets walk-off win #355 was historic, as it marked the first time that a Mets player had five hits, including a walk-off hit in the same game. So kudos to Carlos Delgado on that, and his first five-hit game since 1998. It was the 30th time a Met has collected 5+ hits in a game.

The previous "record" of four hits, including a walk-off hit, was shared by this odd combo:
Rico Brogna, Steve Henderson, Carl Everett, Eddie Murray, Butch Huskey, Mookie Wilson, and Tim Harkness. Henderson's four-hit game, on May 18, 1978, also came against the Braves.

* Delgado now has 5 walk-off RBI for the Mets, coming via four hits and a walk.

* Official scorer Bill Shannon awarded Delgado that hit when leftfielder Omar Infante lost his line drive in the lights. If you disagree with that call, you're not alone. Had it been ruled an "E7," it would have been the second walk-off E7 in Mets history, the first since June 2, 1963, when a collision between Bill Virdon and Jerry Lynch resulted in a Lynch error and a 2-1 Mets win over the Pirates.

* This was the second time the Mets got a walk-off win against Vladimir Nunez, the first since Tsuyoshi Shinjo beat him and the Marlins with an 11th inning double on July 18, 2001.

* The last Mets walk-off win against the Braves was May 5, 2006 (David Wright 14th-inning double). Coincidentally, that's the last time any Met had five hits in a game (Jose Reyes).

* The last Met to go 5-for-5 was Ty Wigginton, against the Diamondbacks, in a 12-8 loss on May 10, 2004.

* The last Met to go 5-for-5 in a Shea Stadium win was Dave Magadan, against the Astros, July 24, 1987. In fact, any 5-hit game for a Met at home is a rare event.

5 Hits+ at Shea Stadium
Mets History

Carlos Delgado, 2008
Jose Reyes, 2006
Dave Magadan, 1987
Wally Backman, 1985
Rusty Staub, 1975
John Milner, 1972
(Mets never had a 5-hit game at the Polo Grounds)

* The only other Mets with 5 hits and no runs scored in a game were Jose Vizcaino, against the Marlins, on September 23, 1995, and Keith Hernandez, in a crushing loss to the Cardinals on October 3, 1985.

* Luis Ayala is the first Mets pitcher whose last name started with "A" to get a walk-off win since Juan Acevedo beat the Marlins on July 6, 1997 (Carl Everett, 11th inning single)

* The Braves are 30-51 since the Mets last visit to Atlanta. The Mets are 49-34 since that Braves four-game sweep.

* August 21 is a good day for Mets walk-offs. They've won via walk-off on that date in 1962, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1995, 2007, and 2008. The 2007 game was the 7-6 win over the Padres, on Luis Castillo's game-ending single.

True Metbacks (don't) know...The last Mets with a walk-up (bottom of the eighth game-winner) and walk-off RBI in the same series is...I don't know. This question is a pain to check. Maybe I'll get it eventually.

For now, settle for...

Carlos Delgado is the fourth Mets starting first baseman with a 5-hit game, joining Rico Brogna (1994), Keith Hernandez (3 times, all in 1985), and Dick Smith (1964).

Comments

Anonymous said…
"Memo to Omar Infante: Just as yelling at Tom Glavine for two hours in his adopted hometown is a bad way to toy with the karma gods, so is teasing a fan in the Shea bleachers."

Can you elaborate on the above? I haven't heard about any of that stuff.
metswalkoffs said…
Omar Infante, after catching the Tatis flyout, teased the fans in the bleachers, slammed his glove against the wall to say he caught the ball.

I equated that to my trip to Atlanta (to see the Mets get swept) where I spent the majority of the first 2 hours of the first game yelling venomous remarks at Glavine.
birtelcom said…
5-hit games by a Met are rare, but 5-hit games by a Met in a nine-inning game are even rarer. The only Met who has done that more than once is Keith Hernandez, who acomplished this feat an amazing three times in eight weeks late in the 1985 season.
Anonymous said…
Oh, thanks. I thought Omar Infante yelled at Tom Glavine or something...
Anonymous said…
Steve Henderson's 1978 4-for-5 walk-off game was cool, but my favorite Henderson walk-off was one I got to see in person, June 14, 1980. My dad and I always stayed at Shea until the last out and it paid off this time. The Mets entered the bottom of the ninth down 6-1 to the Giants and rallied for two runs before Henderson hit a three-run homer off of Allen Ripley. My dad never cared for Henderson for striking out in clutch situations, but he came through for us that game.

Popular posts from this blog

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 76 (Alex Ochoa) to No. 80 (Dom Smith)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason, giving us 75 overall).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. 
Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’.
80. Dominic Smith’s season-ending walk-off 
(Sept. 29, 2019 vs Braves) True story: I pulled into a parking spot right in front of my apartment as Dominic Smith came to bat. Rather than stay and listen to the ra…

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: From No. 16 (Carl Everett & Bernard Gilkey) to No. 20 (Tommie Agee)

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason).
This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities.
It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100?
The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate.
Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin’. 


The rest of the list can be found here.


20. Tommie Agee reaches new heights 
(April 10, 1969 vs Expos) Tommie Agee set the tone for a new beginning in the first week of the 1969 season. Agee had a dreadful 1968 that began in spring t…

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out.

It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!)

Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required that…