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That's The Ticket

Russell: "We like to look at the show as if it were an EKG. You have your highs and your lows and it goes up and down."

George: "The show will be like a heart attack!"

Jerry: "Just a huge massive coronary."

Jerry and George pitching their sitcom pilot in Seinfeld, Season 4, Episode 4, "The Ticket"

These are your Mets. I think Seinfeld would have appreciated this script.
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Game-winning, late-inning grand slams are in Mets history are rare. Here's a brief history.

* This marked the third time that the Mets won a game, with the game-winning hit being a grand slam in the top of the 9th.

Mets Win In Top of 9th
Winning Hit is Grand Slam

2008- Carlos Beltran (at Marlins)
1999- Edgardo Alfonzo (NLDS Game 1)
1988- Kevin McReynolds (at Cubs...same day as Gary Carter's 300th HR)

* The Mets have had two extra-inning road wins in which the game-winning hit was a grand slam

Mets Win On Road In Extra Innings
Winning Hit is Grand Slam

2000- Benny Agbayani (vs Cubs, 11th inning, in Japan)
1995- Todd Hundley (vs Expos, 10th inning)

* The Mets have had three walk-up wins (won in bottom 8th), in which the game-winning hit was a grand slam

Mets Win In Bottom 8th (Walk-Up)
Winning Hit is Grand Slam

1985- Gary Carter (vs Braves)
1978- Lee Mazzilli (vs Phillies)
1963- Jim Hickman (vs Braves)

* The Mets have had five walk-off wins, in which the game-winning hit was a grand slam.

Mets Win By Walk-Off
Winning Hit is Grand Slam

1991- Kevin McReynolds (vs Expos)
1986- Tim Teufel (vs Phillies)
1980- Mike Jorgensen (vs Dodgers)
1963- Jim Hickman (vs Cubs)
1963- Tim Harkness (vs Cubs)

* This was the first time, for any of those previously-referenced games, that the Mets won by one run.

* It's the third time the Mets have won a game against the Marlins by scoring the winning run in the ninth inning. The previous two were in 2001 and 2007.

* This was the second time that Carlos Beltran had a game-winning hit with the bases loaded and two outs in the ninth inning.

The first was on May 4, 1999. With the Royals trailing the Devil Rays, 3-1 with the bases loaded and two outs in the ninth inning in Tampa, Beltran smacked Roberto Hernandez's 0-2 pitch for a game-winning, three-run triple.

Is it rude for me to wish he'd had one more?

True Metckets know...Carlos Beltran had all five Mets RBI in their 5-4 win. He accounted for all of their runs with his RBI. He's only the second Met to have a 5+ RBI game, in which his RBI accounted for all of the team's runs.

Todd Zeile had 5 RBI in a 5-3 win against the Phillies on June 2, 2004. Zeile tied the game with a three-run home run in the eighth inning, than hit a two-run home run to win the game in the 10th inning. Braden Looper than survived a ninth inning almost as dicey as Luis Ayala's, getting Jim Thome to ground out with the bases loaded to end the game.

Comments

Anonymous said…
This game felt a lot like Sept. 18 of 1973. Luis Ayala of 2008 is somewhat similar to Buzz Capra of 1973.
-- BFed
seth said…
You missed a walk-off slam; even if it went in the books as a single; I'm pretty sure it should be counted here.
Anonymous said…
No, doesn't count. It's officially a single. Romantically, it's called a grand slam single. But officially it's a game-ending ONE RBI single. When Robin failed to touch em all, he officially cost the Mets three runs.
- Bfed
metswalkoffs said…
Yep...doesn't count.
Anonymous said…
Gary Cohen cited this as the first time the Mets were down to their last out and were rescued by a grand slam since Carl Everett on September 13, 1997. Talk about your brand new shiny ones.

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