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I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For

One of the neat things about having a blog is that, in theory, anyone can read it, from anywhere.

And they might not always be looking for your blog.

The magic of the Google search has, for the most part, eluded this blog during its four years of existence.

For the most part, when someone has found this blog via Google search it's because they knew of the blog, but didn't know the exact address, so they punched "Mets Walk Offs" into Google and got me.

Most of those searches ended when the blog changed its URL to eliminate the "Blogspot" reference. And for the most part, so did the arrivals via Google search.

That changed within the last 10 days however. On Friday, I got an e-mail from a reader who informed me he was looking for Brett Hinchliffe's whereabouts and stumbled upon my recent post. He thought I was being serious about Hinchliffe's return to the Mets (he wasn't the only one fooled by my Brett Favre parody) and was curious why he wasn't on their roster yet.

Turned out he found me during a Google search.

So I looked at the website I use to track my hit tallies, and was shocked to find that I've been the recipient of a bonanza. Google searches galore have found their way to me. I want to share some of them because I found them amusing and interesting.

famous seinfeld quote george pink hue
In the Seinfeld episode, The Fix Up, George is very inquisitive regarding the facial features of his blind date. He asks Jerry if her cheek has a "pinkish hue." Replies Jerry in his annoyed manner: "There's a hue."

For me, it was a description of how I felt after a Mets walk-off win.

Orlando Mercado father died home run

Orlando Mercado was briefly a Met, and he may have hit a home run in tribute to his dead father. I don't know.

His significance to me is that I wrote how he once broke up, in the ninth inning the closest thing I ever experienced to a perfect game while playing Strat-O-Matic Baseball.

Mets Young Artists Program

If the Mets have a young artists program, I'd love to see some of the work that results from it.

I imagine this person was checking for a program offered by the Metropolitan Opera House and not a closer examination of Johan Santana's first career win.

April 13, 1967 Mets News

There was some pretty big Mets news on April 13, 1967. It marked the major league debut of one George Thomas Seaver. I hope that's the news to which they were referring.

amy stack at davisvision

When the Mets were pulling numbers off the Shea wall last year, representing how many games remained in that ballpark, they chose not to have a member of the 1969 team pull off #69. Instead, they had two reps from Davis Vision, including one named Amy Stack.

I have yet to get a search for the puller-offers of #68: "Harry and Digit from Cyberchase."

Nuns Day at Mets Citi Field on August 24, 2009

It was actually, but I wrote about a Nuns Day at the ballpark some 40+ years prior.

100 Worst Mets of All-Time

Great idea for a project...coming soon, perhaps :)

1962 mets season ending triple play

A misnomer actually. They actually hit into a triple play in the 8th inning, not the 9th.

Mets took September off

Wishful thinking, though it appears I've written 85 blog entries that put all four of those words to use.

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