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Walk-Offs in Movies, TV, and Other Places

Note: I'm leaving this post up through the end of the week, a) because I don't have time to pump out something new and b)because I was hoping to build a really good list of entertainment industry walk-offs...so if you're looking for something new, check back on Monday or so...

Of course, if there's a major trade or move, I'll adjust and try to post something...

In the meantime, click on the "Table of Contents" link as well. It has been updated.

SPOILER ALERT: Read at your own risk

Caught the ending of "A League of Their Own" on one of the movie channels the other day and it got me to thinking that it would be fun to compile a list of walk-offs from movies, television, and other forms of entertainment. Here's the start, and only the start, as I spent about 30 minutes or so thinking it over Help me fill in the blanks by filling out the comments section.

"A League of Their Own"-- Racine beats Rockford for the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League championship when Kit Keller (Lori Petty) bowls over older sister Dottie Hinson (Geena Davis) to score the winning run on a two-out, two-run, inside-the-park home run.

"Cheers" -- In the episode titled "Endless Slumper," Sam Malone (Ted Danson) gives his lucky bottlecap to Red Sox pitcher Rick Walker (Christopher MacDonald). Sam gets real antsy after he gives the bottlecap away and calls Walker in the middle of a game to try to get it back, but Walker is unavailable until the game ends. Unfortunately for Sam, the game goes 20+ innings (ending on a walk-off home run) and when Rick Walker finally comes to the phone, he tells Sam that he lost the bottlecap. It turns out that the bottlecap was from the last beer that Sam drank before he admitted he was an alcoholic. Sam, tempted to drink again, slides a glass of beer away and picks up a new lucky bottlecap, much to the relief of waitress, Diane Chambers (Shelley Long).

"Fever Pitch" -- Ben Wrightman (Jimmy Fallon) and Lindsey Meeks (Drew Barrymore) enjoy a fine night on the town, but their fun is spoiled when Ben learns he missed a Red Sox comeback walk-off win against the Yankees.

"L.A. Law" -- In an episode titled "The Unsterile Cuckoo"...Arnie Becker (Corbin Bernsen) hits a game-winning walk-off home run, lifting McKenzie-Brackman to a win over a rival law firm in a company softball league.

"The Natural" -- OK, I realize this is gonna get me in trouble, but it's been about 15 years since I've seen this movie, even though it's on often... If I recall correctly, Roy Hobbs (Robert Redford) uses a "Savoy Special" model bat after his "Wonderboy" breaks and hits a walk-off home run for the New York Knights in the next-to-last scene of the movie. The homer hits the light tower and sets off quite a show.

"One Day at a Time" -- In the episode titled "Hardball," 'adopted son' Alex Handris (Glenn Scarpelli) asks his uncle, Max Horvath (Michael Lembeck) to let him play on the local baseball team. Max relents after being persuaded by sister-in-law Barbara Cooper (Valerie Bertinelli). Max gets hurt and is unable to coach the big game, but has the play-by-play relayed to him via walkie-talkie. Alex winds up costing his team the game when he kicks a ball away in the last inning.

"Peanuts" -- In the comic strip by Charles Schulz, Peppermint Patty allows Charlie Brown to get the final out, with her team ahead 50-0 in the bottom of the last inning. Patty goes to sell popcorn, but gets knocked unconscious by a Charlie Brown wild pitch. When Patty is revived she is told that her team lost 51-50, when Charlie Brown gave up 51 runs.

True Metkel & Eberts know...Phil Mankowski, who appeared in 21 games for the Mets in 1980 and 1982 played a teammate of Roy Hobbs in "The Natural." He appeared in one Mets walk-off win, against the Pirates on September 29, 1980

Comments

Binny said…
Fun idea.

The ending of "Major League" had one of the more memorable movie walkoffs, when Jake Taylor (Tom Berenger) came to bat in the bottom of the 9th inning of an end-of-season, one-game playoff against the New York Yankees. With the game tied, and Willie Mays Hayes (Wesley Snipes) leading off second, Taylor bunted the ball as Hayes took off for third. The bunt was fielded cleanly, but Taylor, hustling on two bad knees managed to beat the throw. Hayes, never slowing for a moment, turned third and headed home, sliding in safely to beat the throw and send the Indians into the playoffs. Rick Vaughn was credited with the victory. I believe Harry Doyle's call of the play is either in the Hall of Fame, or just a bit outside.
Anonymous said…
The "WKRP" softball episode ends with Les Nessman making a game-saving catch (OK, so he just stuck his glove in the air, but he had to overcome the taunting voices in his head to do so) and the newscaster walking off the field head held high as WKRP defeats the heavily favored WPIG.
metswalkoffs said…
Well now, if we're gonna talk about dramatic game-ending plays, that's a whole other topic...

My favorite in that category would be from "Parenthood," which come to think of it, had both a walk-off and a game-ending play.

Gil Buckman's (Steve Martin) son Kevin costs his team a game when he muffs a fly ball, allowing an opponent to win via walk-off...He gets all upset...

The next game, a kid on Gil's team decides if anything's hit to Kevin, he's gonna knock Kevin out to make the catch. Well, lo and behold with 2 outs in the final inning, there's a fly ball to Kevin. Kevin and the kid collide, and the ball gets knocked away, but Kevin reaches out and makes a diving catch to earn his team the win.

Gil goes nuts...You often see the celebration scene after a big moment at Knicks or Mets or Rangers games. Good stuff...
Anonymous said…
The game is tied, it's the bottom of the ninth, the bases are loaded, there are two outs, and Strawberry is due to bat. Even though Darryl has hit nine home runs, Burns sends him to the showers because Strawberry and the pitcher are both left-handed. (``It's called playing the percentages.'') He sends Homer, a righty, to the plate instead.

Burns reviews the signals with Homer. Burns' explanation goes on and on, and Homer's mind wanders. ``I wish I was home with a big bag of potato chips. Mmm... potato chips...''

Homer steps to the plate. Marge and the kids cheer. Everyone else boos. Monty goes into a totally bizarre sequence of signs from the third base coach's box, and while Homer merely stares, confused, the pitch hits him in the head knocking him unconscious. But the good news, is that by getting hit by the pitch, Homer wins the game. ``I guess he'll be happy when he comes to,'' notes Marge. The runner from third has to push Homer's body aside to step on the plate. The team carry Homer's unconscious body off the field on their shoulders.

-No my memory is not that good, I got that from a simpsions website.

one of the best simpsons episodes ever.
Anonymous said…
Seinfeld where george knocks out bette midler at the plate to win the game. Which leads the gang into interesting and funny circumstances

-Im bored at work, can you tell?
metswalkoffs said…
Good work, Greg...

regarding the Seinfeld one...I didn't include that initially because I wasn't sure that the game actually ended on that play, or if it was just stopped because of the injury. I may have to watch that episode again.
metswalkoffs said…
And also, let's not forget Dan Rather, who walked off the set of the CBS Evening News when US Open coverage ran a little too long...
Metstradamus said…
I read a blurb not that long ago about the Roy Hobbs home run. It was a walk-off, but apparently, the Knights were listed on the scoreboard as the visiting team.
Metstradamus said…
Didn't Gary Collins hit a walk off home run for the Padres in "The Kid From Left Field"?
canzoneri said…
Was Les Nessman's catch the game ender, or was it Mr. Carlson's 'bomb' after the opposition pulled all the fielder's off the field?

Kelly Leak hit a walkoff in "The Bad News Bears". Then blew off Buttermaker in disgust.

In "Hard Ball", G-Baby hits a walkoff single to put his team in the city championship, before he is gunned down returning to his home in the projects.
metswalkoffs said…
there was another one in "League of Their Own" ...earlier in the film, Dottie hit a walk-off home run.

Just wanted to get that on the record...

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