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Just Another Met-ic Monday

I'm using Monday to update sections of my database, so let's go the "Metscellaneous" route for some quick-hitters...

*Here's a link to an article offering a behind-the-scenes look at "Game 6, The Video Game Reenactment." Good stuff.

Click here: Re-creating a classic - MLB - Yahoo! Sports

*Albert Pujols hit 3 home runs, including a walk-off shot to beat the Reds yesterday. Last guy with three dingers and a walk-off HR in a game was Todd Hollandsworth (2001 Rockies). No Mets player has ever done that. Jim Beauchamp, Ed Charles, Jerry Buchek, Tim Harkness and Rico Brogna each have hit 2 HR in a game for the Mets, including a walk-off shot.

* Javy Lopez and the Orioles were denied a home run when he and Miguel Tejada inadvertently crossed paths on the bases, when Tejada thought Darin Erstad had robbed Lopez of a home run. The folks at Retrosheet offer a nice list of basepath passings and "deprived" 'home runs,' including Robin Ventura's grand-slam single in the 1999 NLCS, but here's one of particular interest to fans of the 2006 squad

"4/29/1985: Yankee Bobby Meacham batted in the top of the fourth inning in Texas with two runners on and one out. He homered off Frank Tanana, but didn’t expect the ball to leave the park. While he was running towards and around first, the runner at first, Willie Randolph was headed back to the bag to tag up. Neither Randolph nor Meacham expected the ball to leave the yard. The collided just past first base and Meacham was credited with a two-run single. By the way, this was Billy Martin’s first day on the job for one of his stints as New York manager."

* Carlos Delgado was having a rather bad day Sunday, until he came to bat in the eighth inning. Granted, he didn't hit a walk-off homer, but his plate performance reminded me of this classic from 20 years ago.

* I'm still bothered early this morning by the actions an anti-Met colleague on Friday, who predicted at my request that my ballpark departure on Saturday would come at approximately 4:30pm, with the scoreboard reading, Brewers 8, Mets 2. I imagine this fellow has had a few instances of walk-off prognostication as well. Unfortunately when I called for the evening's lottery numbers, this person was unable to respond quickly enough for me to emerge victorious.

* Response was rather limited to both my April Fool's posting (I'm not really converting this to a blog about famous walks, but this did give me a good idea for a few future posts) and my request for votes for the real "Player of the Game" for Game 6 of the 1986 WS. Just a reminder to readers to feel free to comment, or even e-mail me at metswalkoffs@aol.com

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