Skip to main content

In-Spiers-Rational

Well, kudos to commenter JB from Long Island. He remembered that Bill Spiers once won a game with a walk-off bunt, one of a slightly more daring variety, on August 18, 1995.

The scenario was that the Mets and Dodgers were tied, 2-2, in the bottom of the ninth inning, with Ryan Thompson on third base and one out. The manager, Dallas Green, was a slightly more daring skipper than Willie Randolph and elected to gamble to try to win the game. It was a particularly fitting maneuver that he planned to execute considering that the Mets had just traded their best bunter, Brett Butler, who was in the Dodgers lineup that day.

Green sent up Spiers, who was in a David Wright-esque 0-15 slump but an ideal candidate for a suicide squeeze. With Thompson charging from third base on the first pitch, Spiers bunted past Dodgers moundsman Mark Guthrie, and Thompson scored the winning run.

"Finessed to perfection" as New York Times writer George Willis described it and I think that description accurately suits Tuesday night's win as well.

The Truly Metspirational know...In honor of JB from Long Island, we can tell you that 3 JB's have had walk-off hits for the Mets: Jerry Buchek, Jeromy Burnitz, and Jim Beauchamp.

Comments

Metstradamus said…
And guess what the trivia question was during the game today? I thought that Ron Darling was going to mention you, because he knew the answer, and said that he knew it because he was on the computer. But somebody else had sent it to him.

Popular posts from this blog

Cliff Notes

Alright, so it's 2 days later and the challenge for me now, after reading through about a dozen game stories and listening to talk radio, is to provide a fresh perspective on walk-off #324. If you're going to be a serious reader of this blog, you know what happened already, so let's look at what made this particular walk-off stand out. It would seem that the place to start is with the idea that everything broke just right on both sides of the ball. Particularly, I'm talking about Carlos Beltran's catch in the 7th inning, where he went over the center field fence to rob Jose Molina of a home run. Every no-hitter seems to have one defensive gem that makes it possible and perhaps that's true of great walk-off moments as well (We'll be looking into that!) Marlon Anderson's home run required a remarkable combination of events. It was only the sixth inside-the-park home run at Shea Stadium by a Met and the first since Darryl Strawberry in 1989. It required t

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: No. 2 Darryl Strawberry Clocks One

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason). This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities. It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100? The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate. Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin.'  Before I get into the details of this one, I want to note a couple of home runs that didn’t make the list. Two days before the Mets played the Cardinals in the series that decided the NL East title

Mets Top 100 Home Runs: No. 5 Mike Piazza With A Special Delivery

In 2009, I did a project for my website, Mets Walk-Offs and Other Minutiae, celebrating the best home runs in Mets history. I selected the top 60 regular season home runs and the top 15 postseason home runs. The reason I picked 60 was because it represented the top 1% of home runs in Mets history (and 15 just felt right for postseason). This was fun to do, but it was imperfect. I had one egregious omission. I tended to favor oddities. It’s time to give that project an update. And why not do it as a top 100? The Mets have hit 7,671 regular season home runs. The top 80 represent about the top 1%. And the top 20 postseason home runs get us to an even 100 to celebrate. Come along for the ride. Hopefully you’ll enjoy the reminiscing. Hopefully you’ll find it Amazin.'  I can tell you exactly what I had for dinner on June 30, 2000. “Chicken & Swiss on honey wheat” was a frequent cry from the local fast food eatery. That sounds weird, I k